By: Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Stories of legal battles over frozen embryos have been making the rounds in the news lately.  Beginning with the high profile case in 2013 between Sofia Vergara and her former fiance,  Nick Loeb, cases concerning couples’ frozen embryos became more popular.

Legal Issues

The problem couples face when they separate and have remaining frozen embryos is deciding what to do with those embryos.  They can decide whether to store the embryos, destroy the embryos, donate them to science, or donate them to a couple with fertility issues.

Courts addressing the issue face a strange mix of Constitutional, family law, and contract law questions. The case can become even more complicated when the couple was never married. Courts must decide what rights each parent has and what rights, if any, the embryos themselves have.

Michigan Case

An interesting case arose in Michigan this month when an unwed couple started a legal dispute over their frozen embryos.  The former couple have a child together who has sickle cell disease.  The mother believes she could use bone marrow from another child she conceives to ease her daughter’s suffering and possibly save her life.

The father refuses to consent to the release of the embryos. The matter is currently in litigation, but there should be an outcome in the next few months.

The Law

Historically, most of the parents seeking custody in a frozen embryo dispute have lost.  Courts usually see the Constitutional right of privacy of one parent who chooses not to reproduce prevailing over the right of the other to bear a child and any contract that existed before between the two.

Exceptions to this rule have applied where the parents in the case suffered from cancer and the treatments took away any other chance they had to reproduce.

Embryo Donation in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, we do not have specific, published cases concerning custody of human embryos.  However, we do have statutes that address embryo donation in adoption. If an embryo is donated, Oklahoma statutes require both couples to consent to the donation and adoption. The consents must be filed with the court.

The statute states the receiving couple will legally be the parents of the child born from the embryo and the donating couple is relieved of all parental responsibility.

If you have questions about embryo donation or custody, consult with a health care attorney today!