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Category: Oklahoma Families

6 Concerns When Making Your Home Senior-Friendly

By: Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Many baby boomers are aging, causing a spike in our elderly population.  To prepare a home for an aging loved one, you must consider some unique challenges seniors face.  For example, seniors are known to fall more frequently than their younger counterparts, have mobility issues, and have more trouble with their sight.

Today, we will discuss 6 concerns when making your home senior-friendly, whether for yourself or a loved one.

(1) Bathroom Accommodations

Walking and standing on slick, wet surfaces can be difficult for anyone.  This is especially true for our elderly population.  To help seniors lower their risk of a serious fall and injury, consider adding a walk-in tub with a door that opens into the tub/shower and shower seating.

(2) Lights

Lighting can help prevent falls in the home.  Simply putting lighting in places like stairways and near steps can show people where they need to place their feet so as not to fall. Lighting also helps seniors see better in general, improving their quality of life when aging in place.

(3) Accessibility for Walkers and Wheelchairs

Seniors may need the help of a wheelchair or walker to get around.  Widening hallways can help prevent falls and allow elders greater mobility.  Also, adding ramps in place of stairs can make access easier for everyone.

(4) Heights of Cabinets and Countertops

Changing countertop and cabinet heights can help prevent falls for those with limited reach. Shelves that rotate are also an option to provide better access.  They can swing out to accommodate seniors and be returned after use.

(5) Access to Second-story

Many seniors have a hard time getting up and down stairs.  If you or your loved one have a second story, you should consider installing an elevator or chair lift. You may also want to consider moving the sleeping area for the senior to a downstairs room.

(6) More Concerns

Seniors face issues other than mobility, falls, and sight.  They may find it hard to hold or grip everyday household items like door knobs or faucets.  Consider installing new faucets and knobs that they can use.

Each senior will also have their own, unique set of limitations.  Be sure to address those needs and concerns in your loved one’s home.

 

5 Estate Planning Concerns for Single Parents

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

For married couples, many decisions regarding who manages assets after death and makes medical decisions for their spouse can be relatively easy.  When a family involves a single parent, those questions can become more complicated.

Today we’ll discuss 5 concerns single parents should consider when making their estate plans.

(1) Who Will Take Care of the Kids?

Who would you want to take care of your minor children if you’re unable to?  If you are a divorced parent, the default will be the other parent, if that parent is living. If that parent dies before you, or for another reason is not in the children’s lives, you will need to choose someone you trust to care for your children.  If that person does not have the financial resources to take on an extra child or more, you may want to consider establishing a trust for the care of the children.  These trusts can be funded with life insurance proceeds, or any other assets you have.

(2) Are You Insured?

As a single parent, your financial responsibilities are greater than married families.  You carry the entire burden yourself.  Be sure to look into life insurance and disability policies so that you and your children can be covered financially during any times of disability or death.

(3) What Happens if You’re Incapacitated?

All estate plans should include incapacity planning.  If the children are adults, they can help make medical and financial decisions for their parent if they’re incapacitated.  If they are not adults, you will need to find a family member or close friend who can help make medical and financial decisions for you when you are unable.

(4) Do You Have a Trust?

If you have young children, a trust is the only way to ensure they will not receive their money until you are ready for them to and to control the way those assets can be managed.  If you have an ex still living and the children are minors, without a trust, the money will go directly to your ex to manage for the children as he or she sees fit.  If that situation doesn’t sit well with you, you will need a trust for your children with a manager that you trust to handle their assets correctly.

(5) Have You Updated Your Estate Plan?

Estate plans should be reviewed regularly to update beneficiary designations and ensure the documents still meet your intentions.  Transitional periods such as marriage, divorce, and when minors become adults are all very important times to review all plans and update them.  Don’t wait.  Take out your plan today and review it.

Single parents have a lot of responsibilities.  It can be easy to forget about the details of planning for your children if you die or are unable to care for them.  However, planning is even more important for single parent families, since they do not have a default person to rely on.

Reach out to professionals to help you refine your own estate plans.

6 Common Adoption Questions

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

When you are looking to grow your family through adoption, it is an exciting, yet nervous time.  Though some people adopt through family relationships- stepparents, grandparents, etc., that is not always the case.

If you are looking to adopt, below are answers to some of the most common questions we’re asked about adoption.

(1) How Do I Adopt?

The first adoption option is through agencies.  Agency adoptions include private and public agencies.  Oklahoma’s public agency is the Department of Human Services.  Private agencies are available throughout the U.S. and Internationally.  If you are using a private agency, be sure it is a reputable one that you or someone you know is familiar with.

Another option is independent adoption. These adoptions are generally facilitated through attorneys, other professionals, or the pregnant woman herself.  Independent adoptions in Oklahoma have the greatest potential for abuse, as biological mothers can revoke consent to adoption any time before they have given consent in court to a Judge, or their rights have been legally terminated.

(2) What Children Are Available for Adoption?

Many different kinds of children are available for adoption.  They come from all different backgrounds, races, nationalities, and religions.  Children can be adopted from the U.S. or internationally.

(3) How Long Does it Take?

The longest part of the process is finding your child.  Waiting times for placements vary depending on your specific interests and qualifications.  Public agencies adopt out children whose parents’ rights have been terminated.  Since their goal is reunification with the family, that generally means they have more older children available.  Private agencies generally allow the biological parent to choose the adopting parent, so you are subject to the likes and dislikes of the parents.

Once you find your child, the legal process in Oklahoma can take 3 months to 1 year, depending on the status of the adoptive child’s parents and the likelihood the biological parents will fight the case.

(4) How Much Does it Cost?

Costs vary depending on the placement used for adopting your child.  Public agencies tend to cost less, and usually cover adoption expenses.  So, public agency adoptions range from 0 – about $2,000.

Private agencies range from $4,000 – $30,000 depending on the agency and services.

Independent adoptions are hard to pinpoint.  In Oklahoma, adoptive parents can help with some expenses of the biological mother.  The biological mother will also need to have an independent attorney hired for her.  So, you are looking at a range of about $5,000 – $30,000 or more, depending on your contract with the biological mother and court costs and attorney fees.

International adoptions can cost $8,000 – $30,000 or more.

(5) What if I’m Single?

Oklahoma laws allow single people over the age of 21 to adopt children.

(6) What Information Will I Give?

You will have to pass a background check and a home study.  Throughout this process, they will check for criminal records, learn about your family history and background, talk about your motivation and expectations for adoption, learn about your family environment and parenting style, and check your physical, employment, and health history.

 

6 Financial Tips for New (or Expecting) Parents

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Did you know the average cost of raising a child to adulthood in the U.S., according to 2015 statistics, is estimated to be $230,000?  This does not include extras like private school or college education. This is just the bare-bone basics.  Shocking, I know!

So, what are some tips experienced parents have to help new and expecting parents save and budget their money? Here are 6 tried-and-true tips!

(1) Plan for Formula and Diapers, and Then Budget More

Keep in mind the average child is not potty-trained until 3 years old.  Yep, you read that right. Three.  That’s a lot of dirty diapers to change!  And newborns are expected to have at least 6 dirty diapers a day!  So, budget for those added diaper expenses.

Also, prepare as though you will buy formula.  Most mothers intend to breastfeed as long as possible.  But, in reality, some mothers are unable to breastfeed at all, and others may find the task too difficult when returning to work.  That may be because their employer doesn’t offer an adequate space, or because they are physically drained from constant feeding and pumping.

Whatever the reason, you may need formula sooner than you think.  So budget for it from the start.

(2) Subscription Services

There are several subscription services available to new parents.  These subscriptions usually come with some great savings.  Amazon has Subscribe and Save, there’s also diapers.com, and other subscription services to explore based on your family’s needs.  Check them out!

(3) Don’t Budget too Much on Toys

The truth is, most younger children do not play with many toys, or get bored easily with their toys.  Consider establishing a 529 College plan instead of having a toy budget.  Family and friends can contribute to the fund directly.

Other great “investments” for baby’s birthday include clothes, diapers, and books.

(4) Get Involved in Your Local Community

Local libraries are a great way to get social interaction for your children for free or low cost.  Also, check out local playgroups and mom communities.  Many are easily accessible online through Facebook or Meetup.com.

(5) Don’t Forget Those Extra Weeks

We all know a year is made up of 52 weeks.  But, sometimes we forget those sneaky extra weeks.  Those extra weeks can make your child’s needs, like daycare, more expensive.  Be sure to remember and account for them in your budget.

(6) Check Out Consignment and Other Second-Hand Shops

Let’s be honest.  Most babies hardly wear their clothes before they grow out of them in the first year.  Don’t be afraid of second-hand items.  They’re great deals!

The Oklahoma City Metro has wonderful consignment options.  There are brick and mortar buildings, like Once Upon a Time and Storkland.  There are also many mom clothing exchanges throughout the year and throughout the metro, such as Just Between Friends and Moms of Multiples, just to name a few.

Keep an eye out and talk to Mom friends to find the best bargains for your baby!

The best resource for any new parent is the knowledge and support of other parents.  Reach out to your tribe, or find one for yourself, and heed their sage advice!

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