Sarah Stewart Legal Group, PLLC

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Month: June 2018

6 Trustee Duties We Can Learn From Lisa Marie Presley’s Suit Against Elvis’s Trustee and Business Manager

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

In February of this year, Lisa Marie Presley filed suit against Barry Siegel, Elvis Presley’s former business manager. Presley claims that Siegel squandered her $100 million inheritance down to tens of thousands of dollars while managing Elvis Presley’s trust he established for his family. Lisa Marie Presley is the only surviving heir to that trust.

Presley brought her suit in probate court, alleging the probate court system was the proper forum, since Siegel accessed the money as Trustee of the Presley trust.  She alleges Siegel acted in his own best interests in spending the money, contrary to his role and responsibilities as Trustee.

Siegel tried to get the case thrown out.  He argued Presley brought the suit in the wrong court.  But, a Judge ruled this week that the suit could continue.

Trustee Responsiblities

Presley’s case accuses Siegel of ignoring his responsibilities as Trustee to manage the trust.  A Trustee has certain duties and rules he or she must follow when handling trust assets.  If Presley prevails in proving Siegel breached these duties and responsibilities, he could be liable to her for the money he lost.

If you are choosing a Trustee, or have been named a Trustee yourself, you should be aware of the duties Trustees have. Your trust document will control a lot of the responsibilities and duties of the Trustee, but if the document is silent as to some responsibilities, the default duties are below:

(1) Duty of Loyalty

Trustees must be loyal to the beneficiaries of the trust.  Trustees must manage the trust in the best interests of the beneficiaries and not gain anything personally from the business they conduct for the trust.

(2) Duty of Fariness

Unless the Trust makes specific provisions otherwise, the Trustee must be fair and impartial to all beneficiaries and treat them equally.

(3) Duty to Account

Trustees must provide beneficiaries with information about the administration of the trust. This includes information about the income and expenses of the trust and the assets in the trust.

(4) Duty to Protect Trust Assets

Trustees must follow the terms of the trust when managing the assets of the trust.

(5) Duty to Separate

Trust assets must be owned by the trust and kept separate from the Trustee’s personal assets.  Trustees cannot comingle the trust’s assets with their own.

(6) Duty of Care

Trustees cannot invest trust assets in high risk investments.  They must keep the beneficiaries in mind at all times. Trustees must also manage the assets of the trust carefully, paying all bills associated with the trust and taking proper care of income from the trust.

Choosing your own Trustee can be difficult when you consider the many challenges  Trustees face when managing estates. Being a Trustee can be a hard job.  It becomes harder the more assets the Trustee must manage for the trust.

If you have questions about establishing a trust and choosing a Trustee, or acting as a Trustee of an existing trust, reach out to an experienced Estate Planning attorney today!

 

Lessons from Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade on Planning for Your Estate When You’re Separated

Photo: Laurie Woolever/Grub Street

Photo: Wendy Maeda / The Boston Globe via Getty

By: Sarah Stewart Legal Group

The world was rocked this month with the news of the suicides of TV Personality and Chef, Anthony Bourdain and Fashion Designer, Kate Spade. Though the two share their tragic means of death, they also share something else.

When they died, both Bourdain and Spade were separated from their spouses.  Separations don’t only lead to legal battles in divorce court, they can also cause a whole new set of problems for estate planning.

When couples choose to remain separated for a longer period of time and don’t finalize a divorce, they open their families up to complex, and often, messy legal issues if one of them dies.

Deciding on Separation Instead of Divorce

Studies show more and more families are choosing to separate permanently instead of filing for divorce.  Bourdain was open about his choice to separate from, but not divorce, his wife of many years.

He stated in a People Magazine article in 2016 that his choice to separate permanently was based on his belief it led to a better co-parenting relationship of his child with his wife.

Though the concept may be nice for child-rearing, if possible, the arrangement has led to a hiccup in Bourdain’s funeral and estate planning.  By law, since they are still married, his wife is his beneficiary, and the person who makes decisions regarding his funeral and what happens to his remains.

It has been reported that his body will be cremated in France and the ashes shipped to the U.S. This decision may be difficult for family members who may have more of a stake and interest in funeral decisions than a wife he hasn’t lived with for several years.

Additionally, since she is still Bourdain’s wife, she will be eligible for certain Social Security and other benefits she would not have received had the couple divorced.  Benefits that may have gone to his child in other circumstances.

Kate Spade and her husband were reportedly separated when she died as well.  Her family will face similar challenges to Bourdain’s.

Proper Planning

If you choose to permanently separate instead of divorcing, there are some options to protect your estate.

(1) Healthcare Directives

If you are concerned that your spouse may be able to make healthcare decisions if you are unable to, you will want to consider putting an Advance Directive into place.

Although Oklahoma law does not provide that anyone can make those decisions without a valid Advance Directive or Court Order in place, in practice some facilities have policies that allow them to work with “closest kin.” Separated or not, if you’re married, that’s your spouse.

To protect yourself from that situation, you will want to implement a Healthcare Directive and choose a healthcare proxy to make those decisions.

(2) Trusts

Generally, couples separating are restrained from making any changes to legal documents during their proceedings.  The reasoning behind this requirement is that the couple is assumed to be working toward completing the divorce and separating the assets and the Court wants to make sure nothing is moved or spent before the finalization.

If you know that you will not finalize a divorce, you should talk to your family law attorneys about provisions in your paperwork for your case to allow you and your spouse to change your estate plans.

If an estate goes through probate, your spouse can always argue for a marital share.  If you do not have a plan in place, or only have a Will, your estate will go to probate.  With a Trust, going to court is less likely.

Though your spouse could still sue and argue for a marital share, if you both sign off on the documents, it is far less likely your separated spouse would take from your estate and you could have more control over who gets what.

If you are in a permanent separation, be sure to reach out to your financial and estate planning professionals today!

 

Legal Battles Possible Over Frozen Embryos When Couples Separate

By: Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Stories of legal battles over frozen embryos have been making the rounds in the news lately.  Beginning with the high profile case in 2013 between Sofia Vergara and her former fiance,  Nick Loeb, cases concerning couples’ frozen embryos became more popular.

Legal Issues

The problem couples face when they separate and have remaining frozen embryos is deciding what to do with those embryos.  They can decide whether to store the embryos, destroy the embryos, donate them to science, or donate them to a couple with fertility issues.

Courts addressing the issue face a strange mix of Constitutional, family law, and contract law questions. The case can become even more complicated when the couple was never married. Courts must decide what rights each parent has and what rights, if any, the embryos themselves have.

Michigan Case

An interesting case arose in Michigan this month when an unwed couple started a legal dispute over their frozen embryos.  The former couple have a child together who has sickle cell disease.  The mother believes she could use bone marrow from another child she conceives to ease her daughter’s suffering and possibly save her life.

The father refuses to consent to the release of the embryos. The matter is currently in litigation, but there should be an outcome in the next few months.

The Law

Historically, most of the parents seeking custody in a frozen embryo dispute have lost.  Courts usually see the Constitutional right of privacy of one parent who chooses not to reproduce prevailing over the right of the other to bear a child and any contract that existed before between the two.

Exceptions to this rule have applied where the parents in the case suffered from cancer and the treatments took away any other chance they had to reproduce.

Embryo Donation in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, we do not have specific, published cases concerning custody of human embryos.  However, we do have statutes that address embryo donation in adoption. If an embryo is donated, Oklahoma statutes require both couples to consent to the donation and adoption. The consents must be filed with the court.

The statute states the receiving couple will legally be the parents of the child born from the embryo and the donating couple is relieved of all parental responsibility.

If you have questions about embryo donation or custody, consult with a health care attorney today!

 

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