Sarah Stewart Legal Group, PLLC

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Month: April 2018

Plan Well For Your End of Life Like Barbara Bush and Betty Ford

Source: http://www.fordlibrarymuseum.gov/images/avproj/pop-ups/2008-NLF-021.html

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Everyone is familiar with former first ladies Barbara Bush and Betty Ford. Both impacted countless lives with their service, albeit in different ways. Barbara Bush advocated for children and literacy and died just days ago, on April 17th. Betty Ford was politically active and an avid feminist who died on July 8, 2011. Their deaths left a void in America’s hearts and can teach us valuable lessons.

Barbara’s Planning

Barbara Bush was an elegant woman.  Her death was no different.  She made choices in her estate plan that allowed her to decide how she would live out her final days.  Her well-lived life deserved nothing more than a well-planned end. The circumstances surrounding her death prove she had a healthcare directive in place.

Barbara chose to stop treating her chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure. She chose to return home for her final days. Her plans enabled her to spend her last days peacefully with her family, enjoying a bourbon as her last drink.

Without a healthcare directive, families are left wondering what their loved ones’ wishes were for their medical care and treatment at the end of their lives. A healthcare directive tells your family what you want, and who you want to make important decisions, like withdrawing life support.  Oklahoma law does not give authority to anyone, absent a directive, to agree to withhold or withdraw life support for a loved one.

Unlike Barbara, many U.S. citizens avoid planning their deaths. A study from the Palliative and Advanced Illness Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania in 2017 showed that 71 % of Americans do not have healthcare directives in place.

Let’s learn a lesson from this influential First Lady and make our plans today!

Betty Ford’s Special Wishes

Betty Ford was a spirited, opinionated, and lively first lady.  In keeping with her character, Betty Ford used her estate plan to get her wish of having Cokie Roberts deliver a eulogy based on how political partisanship hurts the United States.

Betty left Cokie Roberts instructions on her eulogy, stating she wanted Cokie to discuss government in the 1960s and 1970s and how the parties were required to work together, mostly because they often socialized together. She picked Cokie Roberts because her father was a Democratic Congressman known for working well with a Republican, Gerald Ford.

Many families struggle with funeral arrangements.  They ask themselves what their loved ones would have wanted.  The more specific you are in your estate planning documents, the less guesswork you leave for your family.  These are your documents.  Make your funeral the party, or non-gathering, you always wanted it to be!

Follow the examples of these strong, memorable first ladies.  Reach out to a professional to take action on your estate plans.  Or, at the very least, start thinking about and writing down your wishes so your family can honor them and you can put them in more binding form later.

Start talking to your families out loud.  Let them know what you want.  These conversations may not seem easy, but the reality is, few things that are worth it ever are.

The Importance of Business Exit Planning

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

Oklahoma is a thriving environment for small business owners. In 2013, the Small Business Administration reported there were 337,066 small businesses in Oklahoma.  Small businesses were defined in this survey as companies employing less than 500 employees.

Though business owners are savvy and skilled at many things, small business owners often neglect to realize the importance they have in their community, and the importance of planning for the continuation of their businesses when they can no longer run them.

And, let’s admit it, just like everyone else, we all hope to retire some day! If you want to do that successfully, you have to plan adequately.

So, the question is what should these business owners do with their businesses? How can we successfully leave behind the day-to-day activities and retire from our businesses when the time comes?

Studies have shown that for small business owners, on average, at least 85% of our net worth is tied up in our businesses. In order to properly withdraw assets from a business, you need to make a plan early.

The best exit plans will explore (1) when you will leave your business, (2) how you will sale or transfer ownership in your business, (3) how much money you will need to retire from your business.

You will also want to consider other factors that may be important to you, like how to care for long-time employees, maintain your business’s reputation, and stay involved with your community.

When making your succession plan, be sure to think about (1) asset protection- both for your business and your personal assets, (2) how to minimize taxes and maximize value, (3) training a successor, (4) continuing the business, and (5) wealth and estate planning.

Your exit plan should be fluid, allowing you to adjust to changing circumstances in your business.  What if your first choice for successor isn’t available?  How would you determine a secondary option? What if an unforeseen buyer offered you a lot of money to buy your business?  What could they offer to buy you out?

To properly transfer a business to someone in your family or an employee, you will want to start the process at least 6 to 8 years ahead of time. If you want to sell, you should begin courting buyers at least 2 to 3 years in advance.

In every financial and business matter, the more you plan, the better it is for you and your family.  Thorough planning ensures your course of action when you are ready to step out of your business.

It is never too early to start your exit plan, and the plan can be updated as your circumstances change. The most important thing is to start!

3 Considerations to Secure the Financial Future of Your Child with Special Needs

By Sarah Stewart Legal Group

In a 2011 study, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated 1 in 7 children are diagnosed with developmental disabilities. That means more than 10 million children in the U.S. have developmental disabilities.

Though the amount of help each child may need in the future varies, one thing is certain, for families with children with special needs, planning for your child’s financial future is even more important.

Special concerns for families with members with special needs include securing proper and affordable health insurance, appropriate life insurance, and wealth and estate planning with a qualified planner who has an awareness of how those plans can impact the child’s benefits.

Health Insurance

Insurance premiums for children with special needs can be pricey.  But, given the extra medical attention they may need, insurance is worth it in the long run.  Shop around for the best fit for your family.

Life Insurance

Life insurance is important for every family.  But, in a family with a member with special needs, the right life insurance can be invaluable.  Your family can use life insurance to help care for a family member with special needs when you are no longer able to do so yourself.

Wealth and Estate Planning

Though many families expect to raise their children and send them out on their own around the age of 18, families with members with special needs are different.  Often, these families care for their members with special needs well past the age of 18, making the division of assets at a parent’s death extremely important.

If an heir of an estate has benefits in place for his or her special needs, an inheritance can disqualify the heir from those benefits.  So, it is important to put a Special Needs Trust in place with Trustees that you can rely on to manage inheritances on the heir’s behalf.

A properly established Special Needs Trust can provide for the heir without removing established benefits, name someone to care for the heir after his or her parent’s die, and put a plan into place to help the heir as he or she grows older.

If you have a child with special needs, planning is not just a convenience, but rather a necessity.  Reach out to professionals today to help you plan for your child’s future.

 

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